Leadership with heart, mind, and soul

Investing in Yourself

Added on by Sam Davidson.

Investment can be a great - but risky - way to create wealth. Whether you want to speculate in commodities, put some money in mutual funds, or write a check to a start-up, investing via ownership can make you lots of money (or cause you to lose it).

Of course, doing nothing creates nothing. While stockpiling cash under a mattress means you probably won't lose it if a company goes under, that money won't be making more money, either.

It's up to you whether or not to invest, but there's one entity that not investing in will make things worse - yourself.

Each of us has ample chances to invest in ourselves. A college degree, continuing education, conference attendance, reading books, sharing ideas, networking - these are all chances to invest in ourselves.

Each opportunity costs money, but if they cause your asset - you - to appreciate, it's money well spent.

Every year, I invest in myself and spend money and time meeting people, traveling, producing videos, and buying advertising so that I can get more speaking gigs, build my network, and grow the depth and breadth of my business. I consider it all an investment and so far, the returns are great.

I also love to see when companies invest in themselves, especially companies I'm a part of. That's why I want to turn your attention now to this job posting from CAMPUSPEAK, the agency that represents me when I speak to college students.

CAMPUSPEAK has posted an entry-level sales job, working in a fun environment with people and a business that makes a difference. You get to live in Colorado. You'll learn a lot. And best of all, you're working with a company that will invest in you. You can know this because it's willing to invest in itself by spending money on a position like this, growing its team so it can keep doing what it's doing well.

Learn more about the job and if it's right for you, apply.

And let this be a lesson that the companies worth working for are those willing to do what it takes to grow, get better, and be around for a very long time. Any company - or person - not willing to invest in itself is one you should be cautious of because its best days are behind it.